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26th September 2017 
About Counselling. room

About counselling


I have practised in Leeds, West Yorkshire for ten years and in that time I have worked with client suffering from a range of emotional issues.

Counselling and psychotherapy are 'talking therapies' first developed by Sigmund Freud and then by numerous psychotherapists including Carl Gustav Jung, Aaron Beck, Carl Rogers.

Since then many changes and new approaches have been developed , however, what is well documented is that the relationship between the counsellor and the client is the most important property and the most therapeutic aspect of counselling.

By talking through our issues we can gain a better view of what is going on for us. We can be anxious, depressed, angry or just confused about our life. Sometimes they all affect us at once or maybe just one. I do not utilise one particular approach, for example CBT, rather I work with people with an approach that fits them.

In addition, our relationship with our partner or family maybe causing us difficulties and pain. My work with couples, including LGBT, tends to follow the imago approach.

I consider that during the therapy hour you have my complete attention. Also, I will give you a copy of my contract and in addition we will work together to map out the areas you want to work on. This will be our therapeutic contract.

For some people life may be a painful and threatening experience that makes their behaviour unpredictable. The type of personalities include Borderline, Dependent, Avoidant and Narcissistic types. I have experience of working with these where sometimes they feel suicidal and self-harm.

My approach to therapy is to have a number of therapeutic techniques to use, techniques that will help you the client most. So, I use cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), psychodynamic approach and approaches from Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP)

I spent many years attending and learning Buddhist meditation practices. Mindfulness can be an important component of therapy. One of the major lessons I learnt from Buddhism is that we all crave for things, even me, and that craving rarely does us a service. We become attached to certain things and people in a particular way, and this often causes us suffering.